After Hours

Stark Co. Vet. Emergency Clinic Phone: (330) 452-5116

Metropolitan Veterinary Hospital Phone: (330) 666-2976

Green Animal Medical Center Phone: (330) 896-4040

Lake Cable Animal Hospital - Animal Care Services – Dog

CLEANING YOUR DOG’S EARS

To clean your dog’s ears, you need cotton balls, ear cleaner, large bath towel and ear medications if indicated. For smaller dogs, restrain your pet by wrapping a large bath towel around them if needed. With bigger dogs you may need extra assistance.

  • Pick up the earflap and insert the tip of the bottle of ear cleaner down into the ear canal and gently squeeze the ear cleaner into the ear.
  • Quickly fold the earflap over and gently massage the ear canal. You will want to milk the ear canal up and out. This will help encourage the waxy debris and clean out of the ear since a dog’s ear canal is “L” shaped.
  • Please allow the dog to shake some of the cleaner out of his ears.
  • You will then wipe the excess fluid and debris out of the ear canal with cotton balls. It is safe to clean the cracks or crevasses that you can see with a Q-tip.
  • Place your medication into the ear several hours after cleaning if needed.

You should clean your dog’s ears after a bath, after swimming, playing in the snow or any time they could get a drop of water in their ear or per our recommendations following an ear examination.

After cleaning and treating the ears, it is a good idea to reward you dog with a treat so that next time it may be easier to clean your pet’s ears since you ended the session on a positive note.

FEAR OF LOUD NOISES, STORMS OR VISITS TO THE VETERINARIAN

As with humans, our pets can be afraid of loud noises, storms or trips to the veterinarian, etc. Pets can show fear by shaking, panting excessively, whining, becoming clingy, following you everywhere or wanting to hide in small spaces.

The best way to deal with your pet’s fear is through training and de-sensitization. If it is loud noises, gunshots or thunderstorms that frighten your pet please call the office so we can go over individual solutions for your pet.

Young puppies need to be socialized early to help with the fear of strange places or people. If your pet’s fear involves a trip to the veterinarian, we can help ease your pet’s worries. We can set up “happy visits” which is when you come to the hospital (with advance notice) and we sit on the floor and play with your pet and offer treats. This way when your pet comes to the hospital it is a pleasant experience.

We hope to have a long relationship with your pet and we would like it to be enjoyable for the owner and the pet.

PILLING YOUR DOG

When giving pills to your dog, the easiest method is to hide the pill or capsule in
food such as cheese or peanut butter (as long as your pet does not have any dietary restrictions). Give a plain piece of cheese first, then the piece with the medication in it and then quickly give a third piece of cheese so your dog will swallow the medicated piece quickly in order to get the third plain piece of cheese.

If you are unable to hide the medication in the food, you will have to pill your dog by placing the medication in her mouth.

  • To begin, grasp the upper jaw by placing your left and on top of her nose and insert you thumb and index finger behind the canine teeth.
  • Next raise her nose up towards the ceiling which will cause her mouth to open slightly.
  • With your right hand, hold the pill between your thumb and index finger and use your ring finger and pinkie to gently push down on the lower jaw.
  • Place the pill into the back of your pet’s mouth and close the mouth. Gently stroke her throat, rub her nose, or blow on her nose to stimulate her to swallow the medication.
  • If you have a liquid to give, you can grasp your dog’s nose the same way and put the eyedropper or syringe full of liquid behind the canine teeth and slowly dribble the liquid into the dog’s mouth until she swallows.
  • Reverse the instructions above if you are left-handed.

Always remember to praise and reward your dog after giving the medication so that it will be less stressful the next time.

PUPPIES, PEOPLE & BITING

  • All mouthing is considered biting and should not be allowed.
  • Be consistent – all family members must do the same training techniques and enforce rules consistently.
  • Grabbing the dog’s muzzle is not recommended. Instead, gently put your finger under the dog’s tongue and hold it there without applying pressure & say “no bite”. This is frustrating and unpleasant for the dog and takes the fun out of having fingers in the mouth.
  • void tug-of-war games as this tends to stimulate aggressive tendencies.
  • Puppies and children should never play together unsupervised. Play can escalate to aggression very quickly when youngsters are on the floor which is a puppy’s home turf. Young children should not do the mouth technique but instead can give a high pitched yip. This simulates the response that another puppy would make when hurt from a litter mate that bites too hard. Older children can use the “No bite” command.
  • Remove the puppy from the situation with a brief time-out in the cage or in another room. The cage is a safe zone so the puppy can calm down.
  • When puppy is attempting to bite or mouth redirect their attention by substituting one toy (the same one every time) for your hand. This hopefully teaches your puppy to bring you a toy when he wants to play instead of biting to get your attention.
  • Sometimes the use of a remote control citronella collar (not a shock collar) can be helpful.

GOOD IDEAS TO PREVENT DOG PROBLEMS

  • CHILDREN AND DOGS SHOULD ALWAYS HAVE ADULT SUPREVISION WHEN PLAYING TOGETHER.
  • TEACH DOGS TO ASK NICELY FOR THINGS such as food, toys and treats. Dogs should have to sit for these items and learn to take them gently.
  • DO NOT ALLOW DOGS AND PUPPIES ON THE FURNITURE at least during the initial training and introduction phases.
  • DO NOT WRESTLE WITH YOUR NEW DOG OR PUPPY AND DO NOT ALLOW THE PET IN THE ROOM IF PEOPLE ARE WRESTLING. Your dog will learn how to play with people as you play with them. Wrestling or playing rough will teach them to play rough with all people and potentially cause injury.
  • DO NOT ALLOW YOUR DOG TO EVER BITE OR MOUTH A PERSON EVEN IF IT SEEMS PLAYFUL.
  • TEACH YOUR DOG A COMMAND WORD TO STOP ROWDY BEHAVIOR.
  • PUT YOUR “STUFF” AWAY. Anything not dog/puppy appropriate (such as plants, clothing, trash, children’s toys, etc) should not be within the animal’s reach.
  • CRATE YOUR DOG OR PUPPY WHEN THEY CANNOT BE SUPERVISED BY A RESPONSIBLE ADULT.
  • NEVER LEAVE DOGS AND PUPPIES ALONE OUTDOORS. They can quickly pick up and eat foreign objects (such as dirt, worms, rocks, mulch, grass and plants) which can cause problems ranging from minor digestive upset to more serious problems such as toxicity or intestinal blockages.

CANINE VACCINATIONS

During your dog’s annual or semi- annual examination, we will discuss with you our recommendations for your dog based on our exam, their history and lifestyle. We may recommend blood work, stool checks and deworming, dietary changes, grooming, flea and heartworm prevention, and vaccinations. Listed below are the vaccines available and a brief description.

DHLPP Vaccine – All of the following diseases are highly contagious and can cause some of the following symptoms; diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss, fever, jaundice, coughing, nasal discharge, seizures, and sometimes death.

D– Distemper –This virus can cause seizures and eventually death.

H – Hepatitis- This virus affects the liver and kidneys.

L – Leptospirosis- This bacteria is transmitted by drinking contaminated water and by contact with wild animals like squirrels and other rodents.

P – Parvo- This virus causes vomiting and diarrhea and can be fatal.

P – Parainfluenza- This virus is part of the Tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) group.

The DHLPP vaccine is in an “all-in-one” shot that is recommended for all dogs unless certain medical conditions exist.

RABIES Vaccine – This virus can be transmitted by a bite or the exchange of bodily fluids such as urine, saliva, or feces from an infected animal. Rabies is fatal to both human and pets alike. This vaccine is required by law.

CANINE INFLUENZA Vaccine – This is a virus that affects the dog’s entire respiratory tract from his nose to his lungs. The symptoms can include fever, sneezing, coughing, nasal discharge, lethargy, anorexia and pneumonia. We recommend this vaccine for all dogs.

BORDETELLA Vaccine – This is a bacteria that is part of Tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) group. We recommend this vaccine if your dog goes to obedience school, grooming parlors, boarding kennels, or is otherwise exposed to other dogs.

LYMES Vaccine – This vaccine protects your puppy from Lymes disease, which is transmitted by the bite of an infected tick. The symptoms can include severe pain, fever, lethargy, arthritis and lameness. This vaccine is recommended if your dog is near a wooded area, goes camping, hiking, or engages in other activities that bring him in contact with ticks.

© Lake Cable Animal Hospital 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Designed by Gemini Media Group